14 Replies Latest reply on Apr 29, 2016 1:00 PM by sherylbug

    Be happy with less

    liz taggart

      Quality of life is more about the relationships you have with friends, family and community than just how much money you have.  But without financial resources it can very much limit your life's experiences.  Retirees have a lot more control over their expenses than what they think. Adapting expectations and learning new ways to get your needs met gives you a new sense of freedom and joy

        • Re: Be happy with less
          JerryD

          I assume that most of us have gotten over that new turbo 911 Porsche by the time that we retire.  :-)))

           

          Deferred gratification and shop till you drop go hand-in-hand with"adapting expectations". "I like" is way different than "I need". I would like that new (non-Porsche) car/truck with all the bells, but I may need the same model that is $10,000 less especially with the rare 0% financing offer that came with patience.

           

          And a good budget that allows for most "needs" and a few reasonable "likes" will go a long way to a pleasant and enjoyable retirement.   :-))))

            • Re: Be happy with less
              sherylbug

              I remember back in the 1980s when I got a promotion one of my co-workers asked me if it was going to be "the Mercedes or the BMW".  In the "dress for success" era, that was the mindset.  You had to have external signs of your rise in status, even if the money that went with the promotion wouldn't come anywhere near covering the car payment.  I said my Datsun was still getting me to work and back just fine, thank you.  :-)

               

              By the time we reach retirement age, at least, we should be wise enough to ignore peer pressure.  But we may have inner-directed wants that are harder to ignore.  Hobby supplies have always been my achilles' heel.  Yarn!

                • Re: Be happy with less
                  JerryD

                  Go for it!!!! Just don't go crazy on those hobbies. This is your retirement! Just don't overdo those "likes".   :-))))))

                   

                  If more people practiced delayed gratification, they could probably enjoy all of the likes that they learned to enjoy in moderation. (Gosh! I still would like that turbo 911 Porsche!  What do you mean that I would kill myself? OK! OK! Nag!!!! - Thank goodness for spouses.)   GOOD LUCK!!!!  :-)))

                    • Re: Be happy with less
                      sherylbug

                      No spouse to keep me in line (as if).  But OTOH no danger of going shopping for a couch and coming back with a kayak as used to happen to a friend with a boat-crazy husband. 

                       

                      I do have more yarn than anyone needs, but yarn doesn't go bad and if all else fails I can knit things to sell on Etsy to supplement retirement. :-)

                        • Re: Be happy with less
                          TroutBum

                          I would have expected to see kayaks mentioned as a means of saving money, not wasting it. In fact, if I were to list my top ten money saving tips, I'm sure kayaking would be among them.

                           

                          My wife and I don't have much more than $1,000 in both of our kayaks,and that includes life jackets, paddles and accessories (although my kayak was purchased lightly used). We've owned them for 4 years without a single dollar in fuel or repairs, and we benefit from the recreation, healthy living and fitness. I feel fairly certain it would have cost far more if we chose to spend our kayaking time going to movies, concerts, fitness centers and expensive restaurants. I'm also willing to bet that our medical bills might be more without the health benefit of exercise from paddling.

                           

                          All that said, I agree that a kayak purchased and left in the garage is a waste of money.

                            • Re: Be happy with less
                              JerryD

                              Hmmmm. Maybe if I replace "kayak" with "large canoe" in the following it could explain the growing waistline: "I agree that a kayak purchased and left in the garage is a waste of money."   :-))))

                              • Re: Be happy with less
                                sherylbug

                                TroutBum: Too much shorthand in my previous post. This has been a number of years ago and the husband was in school so money was tight.  Also, kayaks may have been more expensive then relatively.  And I think it was his 4th kayak plus the boat he was building in the spare bedroom without any idea how he was going to get it out.   And he had an expensive salt-water aquarium.  The point being that she made the money and he was getting all the toys.  I suspect that she had to be the "Mom" as long as they were married.  I would have given him the heave-ho long before.

                                • Re: Be happy with less
                                  canthony

                                  Purchase the kayak and put it on top of your car so people think you are very healthy and enjoying the outdoors.  What they don't know won't hurt them.  Also put a sticker on the front side of your car that says HYBRID and then you are almost there in the in-crowd.

                          • Re: Be happy with less
                            canthony

                            Don't buy the Porsche, save all you can and do without as much as you can so that you can leave it all to your grand kids so they can buy the Porsche.

                              • Re: Be happy with less
                                sherylbug

                                I won't be having any grandkids, so I guess I'll have to buy the Porsche myself (and maybe rent a good-looking guy to drive me around. :-) )

                                • Re: Be happy with less
                                  JerryD

                                  Nah. We took care to avoid that possibility. We are leaving everything to the kids, not the grandkids., uless one of the kids pass and the "per stirpes" clause kicks in and passes their share on to the grandkids. Note that no spouse will ever get or control these funds unless there is a minor child and then there should be some legal constraint on their use of the funds, at least that is our hope.

                                   

                                  Now, I see you looking at me with a strange disbelief about my faith in the kids. But we figure that we raised them. If we screwed up, we are not going to bypass them. After all, they have put up with "good old Dad and Mom" for a long time. That's worth some reward, no?  :-)))))

                                    • Re: Be happy with less
                                      liz taggart

                                      I told my kids that I hope to spend every last penny on enjoying my retirement—they are thrilled!!  Having a sound experience with saving, and spending wisely has given them the tools to care for themselves and family in true need.  (not being able to pay your credit card bill is not a need)  I have the luxury of providing extras for my family now and then.  But is very much appreciated and not expected.

                                        • Re: Be happy with less
                                          sherylbug

                                          No kids to have expectations, but I feel pretty much the same way about my retirement.  I plan to work until 70 if I can stand it, because people tend to live a long time in my family.  But on my way there I'm traveling at least once a year (will do my first sailing cruise this year), remodeling the house. I save, but I'm not miserly with myself.  And when I retire I want to travel more, even if it's in a wheelchair.