8 Replies Latest reply on Dec 12, 2014 2:03 PM by Art

    verbal consent - when silence means 'no'

    BoBraxton

      Medicare Part D (our) coverage ships mail order and the organization switched from the former to a new prescription drug service effective the first (or second) day of 2014. About a month ago the Health Care (internist) organization ran into some difficulty getting the new (not refill) prescriptions to be submitted via laptop computer from their office. With help from the covering organization, they got it to work and notified me that all three prescriptions had gone through. Since then (month ago) I have seen nothing (arrive), so I called on the telephone to customer service this morning. The representative informed me that a new Medicare prescription law that took effect January 1 requires "verbal consent." Although we had received no recorded telephone message on our home device, the representative said they had tried to reach me / us two time, the first on 28 August (we were gone the week to vacation cottage). This time I gave them a secondary phone number (mobile) which would have worked, IF they would have left a phone message. Also, I signed up (registered) on a "My" version web site of the prescription drugs service. As Roseann used to say on TV, "It's always something!"

        • Re: verbal consent - when silence means 'no'
          MyR Community Manager

          BoBraxton, thanks for starting a discussion thread and bringing this important topic to our attention.

          • Re: verbal consent - when silence means 'no'
            JoeW519

            My experience is just the opposite! The PCs office emails (2x), calls (3x), and holds your time open 10 minutes after the scheduled appt, all with no follow up from here. Of course your experience was with a Rx .... the PC, again, emails when the Rx is sent and the pharmacy emails and calls when it is filled or (for some reason) delayed.

             

            I was thinking of asking them to cut back, but reading your post makes me think I should just be happy with what I've got. Like you, I'd just assume it all went through as planned unless they actually left a message.

             

            Sheesh.

            Joe

              • Re: verbal consent - when silence means 'no'
                BoBraxton

                Both my spouse and I initially dealt with the local (bricks and mortar) pharmacy; however, each of us has multiple prescriptions. A robo call would give us "a prescription has been filled" but no indication of WHOSE prescription or WHICH prescription. My spouse remains with the local pharmacy (30 days each) but because they will not distinguish one resident from another resident, I have switched entirely to what essentially is a virtual (not bricks and mortar) pharmacy service (90 days at a time, sent securely via USPS). Our Part D - prescription coverage is from a nation-wide Insurance provided by my spouse's previous employment Board of Pensions.

                • Re: verbal consent - when silence means 'no'
                  BoBraxton

                  The mail pharmacy contacted me to say I needed to do something for a (renew) prescription. I did (via push buttons on telephone). They said the work was done, the prescriptions would be filled and would be mailed. Then I got a notification that I needed to contact them to do something else to release the prescriptions. A time went by. Before I did anything further, another notification came - that everything was Ok, nothing else needed to be done, the prescriptions were being shipped. They arrived. Enough for the next 90 days?

                • Re: verbal consent - when silence means 'no'
                  Art

                  My wife and I have both chosen to have our Rx's filled locally. It's nice to have a pharmacist available to answer questions we may have regarding the Rx's. Did the mail order routine a few years ago and was not satisfied, so we moved on. The service is so much better.