7 Replies Latest reply on Aug 12, 2014 8:30 AM by BoBraxton

    mobile cellular

    BoBraxton

      Anyone else a holdout against mobile phone / smart phone / cellular service? First my spouse (before retirement) got a Treo 650 and when (finally) the iPhone for her carrier became available, she got her current phone. I am not a person who phones from the grocery store, so sometimes there are glitches. I refuse to pay the exorbitant charges (for myself, personally). Plus, who would want ta talk with me (or answer if I called). Anyone I can reach on our digital "land line."

        • Re: mobile cellular
          MyR Community Manager

          BoBraxton, thanks for starting a discussion thread!

          • Re: mobile cellular
            JerryD

            I was a very strong holdout from cell technology. You see, I actually designed telephone switches back in my early career. I am all about things that do communications and do it in standard and reliable ways. For a very long time cell technology was all about small and unreliable phones. And on top of that it costs BIG bucks for the privilege to call from anywhere (there is a cell tower). By the way, I too don't often feel the need to call somebody from the grocery store.

             

            We finally bit the bullet because we frequently travel to either a vacation spot or back home. At first we minimized the cost by using pre-purchased minutes to address that issue. But this failed the standardization, small keyboard and reliability downsides. The latest solution to calling had to be supported by the desire to have Internet access from most places to make it fly. The current solution is a Wi-Fi Android tablet that can both handle calls and Internet access. The cost issue is addressed by acquiring a Skype number and adding a monthly subscription for total US and Canada calling. I was blown away when I discovered that this can be had for just over $5/month. True you may be limited to hot spots in your accommodations or from other locations offered by many coffee shops, McDonald's and other known locations, but it is much better than the restrictions one faces from a home based solution. The closest capability to calling and the Internet that I can find with minimal searching is a $45/month service offered by Wal-Mart. I think that a $400-500 annual savings beats that solution,

            • Re: mobile cellular
              TroutBum

              I resisted but lost. It's important in my job to be available anytime an emergency occurs, 24/7/365, so my employer is very generous in paying for a phone and providing a monthly allowance. That may sound good (and is in most ways) but it also contributed to the cell phone addiction. The cameras have become so good that I almost never feel the need to carry a traditional camera. Or a calculator. I do have a GPS in my vehicle but my wife makes fun of me for it. There are just a lot of conveniences included, other than just the ability to call. I'll admit that I don't like, or generally take calls at the grocery, but my wife will text me if she thinks of something we need. Since we live in a rural area it can save on time and gas money.

               

              It's also a safety thing. I spend a lot of time in remote areas and on the water. If I'm on the water and the skies begin to change, it only takes a minute to pull up a weather map. And there was the time a few years ago when my cousin's son was in the woods alone and took a severe fall. He actually broke his back and wasn't able to walk. He didn't have a phone and spent the next 10 hours lying on the ground, as the rain turned to ice and snow, until someone finally found him. A phone would have made a world of difference and the lack of it nearly cost him his life.

               

              All that said, I still prefer a simpler life and when my employer quits footing the bills, and I don't need to be on call, I'm giving real consideration to downgrading to a basic non-smart phone. I guess I can wait until I get home to check the stock market!

                • Re: mobile cellular
                  JerryD

                  I had a job where I traveled occasionally to one of our 5 or 6 hospitals to talk to users and address computer stuff. My boss, an avid cell user, suggested that I get a cell phone to check my voice mail while on the road. When she indicated that the company would reimburse for usage but not the phone, I politely told her that I would just listen to the radio as I drove around. And besides, I was appalled by some of the drivers' inattention while on their cell phones and along side or in front of me on the expressways. I could spot a cell user in front of me by their actions and their "cell phone pose" that included left elbow on the driver's window with no view of their driver's side mirror. I guess the "wisdom" of my decision is being born out by the increasing condemnation of those using their cellphones while driving.  :-)))

                    • Re: mobile cellular
                      BoBraxton

                      bravo!

                      It was amazing when we were in Kenya this February and had a driver (most of the time two) and the vehicle they drove for us. A call would come in on the cell phone. Immediately the driver would pull off the street / road lane - come to a total stop - take the call and complete it - then start back into the traffic lane - no exceptions. There are some awful "crashes" in Kenya (East Africa) but these drivers behaved in a most professional manner. The difference in U.S.A. is that each person (even "children" of 16) has hir (his or her) own vehicle - which means everyone "has to" behave in a professional manner. I was taught NC school bus driving and at age 16 drove a bus to school and home from school each school day. The bus had a speed governor limiting it to 35 mph even though the posted limit might be 55 or NC highway 87. When I would see a long line of vehicles behind my bus (2-lane), I would pull off at a safe "pull-off-sky" and let all the vehicles pass, then resume my bus route. This is a courtesy that was part of the training of young students to be responsible for as many as fifty or more other children transported safely on one bus every day. By the way, if anyone ever got a "moving violation" citation in their own private driving, they were off immediately and permanently as a school but driver, no exceptions. The day I began, the regular driver was "fired" and I was put in place - for the next year and a half through high school graduation 1962.

                    • Re: mobile cellular
                      BoBraxton

                      what a spectrum / range of examples - from a life nearly lost to seeing what the market is doing this second. Personally I do not like spending money, especially over and over where there seems to be "no choice" (of course at some level there is a choice - even "no choice" is a choice / decision). Saving life is no trivial matter, I admit. So far (not quite 70) I like not having a device stapled to my belt / hip.

                      The last year or few at my job (on a 90 acre campus) the employer provided "walkie talkie" units - there were three of us - my boss, myself and a part-time college student helper - which we were required to have at all times - but only while at work, on the campus - I did not take it with me (purposely) when I left work each day / weekend.