3 Replies Latest reply on Sep 26, 2014 9:06 AM by BoBraxton

    getting a rise out of water level(s)

    BoBraxton

      Already this year reporters have written articles at the New York Times and most recently at the Washington Post on rising water levels along the Eastern seaboard, all the way up to Boston -- especially Norfolk, Virginia and all of Tidewater. For sixty-five years my spouse has been going to a "beach cottage" owned by her parents, both of whom have died. We have inherited (buying out three other siblings) and have been maintaining and lightly using for some decades / years. I first went there just before our 1966 college graduation. The property has suffered hurricanes Isabel and Enersto along with many a nor'easter. The family has fortified the shore line by having wood jetties built into the Chesapeake Bay and later large stone "rip-rap" as a "sea wall." Nature continues to have its way. The Post front-page article quotes experts who predict five feet six inches increase in water level by the end of this century. The thing is that on the island (narrow "haven" separating it from the Virginia mainland) has not just one but two properties  offered for sale -- one is three or four houses inland and the other immediately adjacent to the existing: the amount of real estate is, in turn, three acres and six acres. While we consider our next action(s), I am interested in stories with any similarities either in the present or at any period of time during the lifetime of writers / readers.

        • Re: getting a rise out of water level(s)
          MyR Community Manager

          Thanks for starting a discussion thread, BoBraxton!

          • Re: getting a rise out of water level(s)
            Susanna144

            Do you think your property could survive 5-6 ft of additional sea level rise?  I would take the predictions seriously, the same way I do a weather forecast 3-4 days out.  I don't expect it to be exactly right, but it's still a useful guide.  Are you thinking of selling?  It could make sense, especially if you find that you're not getting much benefit out of the place any more.  But if you still love it, and the decades of memories are happy ones, you could ignore the risk it might lose some of its value.  Money isn't everything!

              • Re: getting a rise out of water level(s)
                BoBraxton

                It would not survive. The "floods" we have experienced have come up just to the under side of floor joists.

                This has happened about three times. (The foundation is open, so water from the Bay just flows beneath on the way in and on the way back out). A storm of the century came about 1933 (before hurricanes got names) and is legendary at this Island. The place has sentimental value for all the family (original couple born 1901 and 1904, married 1925), four children, some grandchildren, now a few great-grand children. In fact, our nephew and his wife and two children are enjoying it these few days (went there Thursday and arrived in the evening).