20 Replies Latest reply on Sep 29, 2014 4:04 PM by herbyreed

    5 Part-time jobs post-retirement

    MyR Community Manager

      AARP recently profiled Jose and Jill Ferrer, who are enjoying their retirements by traveling the country in their motor home. In addition to careful planning, they are able to finance this lifestyle through their part-time jobs, managing a website and blog about the RV lifestyle.

       

      The article went on to feature five part-time jobs that retirees should consider. It also included the hours, median pay and qualifications for each position. These five jobs include: Blogger, Athletic coach/umpire/referee, Teacher’s aide, Tour guide and Convention Center jobs.

       

      Use this discussion thread to share your thoughts on working part-time in retirement. Is this something you are currently doing? If so, what is your job? If not, are you considering taking up part-time work in retirement?

        • Re: 5 Part-time jobs post-retirement
          PAULMAC

          I had to retire in 2004 because my husband was very sick.  I gambled that due to the nature of my job and

          that no one else knew my job, that I would be offered part-time work.  It happened 5 weeks later and

          I worked part-time for 6 years (brought my SS contributions up to 36 years = years in the government way

          back when did not contribute to SS).  That was 4 years ago.  Working part-time for 6 years allowed me to

          fully fund our Roth IRAs for that time period.  Too bad the government doesn't allow retirees to continue

          funding Roth IRAs.  It makes sense to me.  The more that I do for myself the less that I depend upon

          the government.  Pensions, interest, capital gains, dividends, etc.  do not qualify as earned income.

          Someday someone might just wake up !!!!! 

            • Re: 5 Part-time jobs post-retirement
              JerryD

              "Working part-time for 6 years allowed me to fully fund our Roth IRAs": I did the same while doing temp jobs while unemployed. I imagine that one could be retired and use any pay to fund one's and one's spouse's Roth to the max. A Roth is very handy since one does not need to take distributions which lets one build a rainy day fun and/or inheritance.

              • Re: 5 Part-time jobs post-retirement
                smaneck

                What you can do in retirement is very slowly roll-over your other retirement accounts into a ROTH IRA. Of course you have to pay taxes on whatever you roll-over so don't do so much that it bumps you up to higher tax bracket.

              • Re: 5 Part-time jobs post-retirement
                CharW100

                I am a proofreader for a firm of court reporters and I work three days a week which somehow turns into five some weeks. I get paid by the page, not the hour. Overall, it is fascinating work most of the time, depositions of witnesses and plaintiffs and defendants for suits such as wrongful terminations, like that. The downside is that a lot of the time I never know what happened in the end. It takes, of course, a good command of grammar and some knowledge of forms, but that can be picked up. I was doing it part-time for years before I retired and have kept it up.  I really like it.

                • Re: 5 Part-time jobs post-retirement
                  yanushkevich

                  Lately the news media has been full of discussions about raising the minimum wage for restaurant workers.  I totally agree that living on minimum wage is hard, and raising it to $15 an hour would help a whole lot of people,

                   

                  But think of it this way:  When I was young and still living at home, going to school, before McDonalds and such, I used to be a short order cook.  Didn't make much more than minimum wage, about $1.25, although the boss would look the other way if we were not too busy and I grabbed a burger.

                   

                  I think these jobs were created for kids to earn some money when they could not do it by mowing lawns or otherwise.  They were NOT intended for folks to put in 40 hours a week and raise a family to boot.

                   

                  I think the issue should be more like, only part-timers can apply for such jobs, so no one would be subjected to these ridiculously low wages and have to make a living out of it.

                   

                  Raising restaurant minimum wage is not a solution.  Providing a chance to train for a new skill, that would be a step in the right direction.  Then again, I see my grand kids' emphasis on sports, as opposed to excelling in math or spelling.  So where does the fault lie?????

                    • Re: 5 Part-time jobs post-retirement
                      sherylbug

                      And what new skills are they supposed to train for, pray tell?  In case you haven't noticed, manufacturing and some other things that used to provide a middle class living have evaporated over the decades since you flipped burgers.  Not everyone is college material and college graduates are having trouble getting a start as well.  The rest of what is out there is mostly low paying bedpan jobs. 

                       

                      There are too many businesses in this country that have built their business model on *not* paying a living wage and then pushing their employees on the government for food stamps and such.  This is not acceptable.  It has to end.

                       

                      And w.r.t. part timers -- how many of these low paying service jobs do you think are full-time?  The answer, practically none already.  And that's been going on for decades.  People get stuck having to try and juggle 3 and 4 low-paying part time jobs to try and pay the bills. 

                        • Re: 5 Part-time jobs post-retirement
                          yanushkevich

                          Sherylbug, I beg to differ with you.  My parents came to this country willing to dig ditches to make a living;  they could not because at the time ditch diggers were union and you could not get a job without a union card.  Then again, you could not join the union without having a job, so as not to steal a "brother's" job.  So my Dad started as a draftsman (a trade long gone) and eventually moved up.

                           

                          I admit today's job are hard to find, so how come when you call for service on an appliance, a trim and clean Latino in uniform shows up and does an A-1 job, or if you need a plumber, or a haircut.  These jobs all pay more than minimum wage, are all in the Service sector, but require gumption, a willingness to learn and work hard as well as get dirty.  That dictum is something no American kid wants to do, they are too busy playing with their Smartphone or IPod.

                           

                          Wake up America, you are letting the boat go by, wait much longer and you will drown!

                          • Re: 5 Part-time jobs post-retirement
                            BoBraxton

                            low-paying is a scandal I agree.

                          • Re: 5 Part-time jobs post-retirement
                            herbyreed

                            The U.S. Department of Labor says that the idea that minimum wage jobs are for teenagers is a myth, that in fact 88 percent of those who would benefit from a federal minimum wage increase are age 20 or older, and 55 percent are women. 

                            This site also addresses many or the other myths regarding the minimum wage.

                            Minimum Wage Mythbusters - U.S. Department of Labor

                             

                            And from my personal experience I remember my mother starting out at minimum wage working in a chicken processing plant.  She was a long way from being a teenager with 5 kids and she was working 40 hours a week, standing on a concrete floor, cutting open chicken gizzards all day long.  There were few breaks and the line kept moving.  Yes she did move up to a few nickels an hour more than the minimum wage after a couple of months on the job but it is just not true to suggest that minimum wage jobs are for developing job skills.  The only skills she learned were ones she could use working in another chicken processing plant. The town had three of them and she worked in two of the three over the course of fifteen years or so. She did earn a bit more when she went to a shirt factory and was able to make more than minimum wage on piece work, but the job only lasted as long as the orders lasted, layoffs were frequent even in the relatively recession free 1960s.  It is easy to make glib talk about teenagers and part time jobs but the truth is that a lot of people depend on minimum wage jobs for their main income and they are raising families on them, often having to work more than one job to make it work.

                              • Re: 5 Part-time jobs post-retirement
                                yanushkevich

                                To answer you, I need to state two facts:  (1) My son in law's mother was a stay at home Mom raising four kids, she was left destitute, still she managed to get a real estate license then fed, housed those kids as well as gave them a start for a college education, my son in law and his brother had to get student loans to finish;   so pulling yourself up by your bootstraps, while not given to everybody is feasible and I believe this is the American Way.

                                 

                                (2) I lived in France for many many years, and there 80% of the work force works for Minimum Wage (They call it the SMIC) which is around $24,000.  Many of these folks don't own cars, and when they go on vacation, many companies provide adult camps for a modicum of expenses.  However the downside to this Socialistic Regime, laws get passed without your approval, if you are not the elite, you don't get to go into politics, you are suffocated with regulations, you can't be fired, except for due cause, so there is no incentive to better yourself;  if your kids are smart, they do get a college education for very little, but what kind of education, 2-300 kids piled up in an auditorium, barely seeing the lecturer.  If you manage to go to an elite school and make a good living, life is great, for most of the rest, it is drudgery, not to mention the many strikes you have to endure, just to get to work, or get first aid.

                                 

                                We need to bring back the work ethics that founded this country and made it great, doing minimum wage jobs is not the way, if fewer applicants existed for such jobs, the pay would be commensurate, unfortunately, people settle for that kind of livelihood too easily.

                                  • Re: 5 Part-time jobs post-retirement
                                    herbyreed

                                    You are offering platitudes to what is a real problem.  My mom worked at the jobs she did because that was what was available to her.  For whatever reason, selling real estate was not.  She did try selling Amway for a while but she was no sales person and it did not work out.  The problem isn't the number of applicants, the problem is the number of good paying jobs.  This is not about people not working hard enough.  My mom worked harder than anyone I know. We all worked from age 16 on and put ourselves through college.  In general Americans work harder - longer work weeks, fewer vacations, take less sick time or family leave, retire later - than any other industrialized country in the world.  It is just not true that Americans do not have a strong work ethic. Working hard is not enough and there is little correlation between how hard people work and how successful they are financially.

                                      • Re: 5 Part-time jobs post-retirement
                                        yanushkevich

                                        There is a big difference between people spinning in one place and others who pull themselves up by their bootstraps, both kind of people work hard, I definitely agree, but if you are just spinning your wheels, you will not be rewarded for your hard work.  You need to focus on your abilities and do what is best for you.. One great things about human beings, everyone has a particular talent or innate skill they can develop, the key is to focus on where that skill lies.  I agree some people are just not able to do that for various reasons, such as infirmities, but that should not dissuade others from trying.

                                          • Re: 5 Part-time jobs post-retirement
                                            sherylbug

                                            When people are trying to juggle 3 low wage jobs to feed and house themselves it doesn't leave much room to do anything but spin.  Going to school or training for something else is almost impossible because the companies you work for can change your schedule on a whim.

                                             

                                            When I was young, I was able to support myself through the last 2 years of college by working at a co-op job.  I was shocked 20 years later to find that typical co-op jobs paid about the same I had earned in the 1970s.  But nobody was able to go to an in-state university for $165/term like I had been.  Instead it was more like $3000.

                                             

                                            In the past couple of decades, the educational system has embraced the service economy and tries to get everyone to go to college.  There are no more shop classes and other programs in high school that prepare kids for going into trades.  Companies used to have some loyalty to employees but that's gone.  It really is very hard if you don't have family support, mentors, etc.

                                             

                                            BTW, in my state university we also had 2-300 people in lecture classes and it's possible to get quite a good education that way.  But you have to have had good preparation in high school and not everyone does.

                                              • Re: 5 Part-time jobs post-retirement
                                                yanushkevich

                                                There is no right or wrong in this discussion, only concrete examples like herbyreed's Mom.  If I was in my twenties, still single hopefully, yet penniless, I would follow the example of an electrician I know.  He is a Jordanian, came to America penniless, signed on with an electrical contractor as a helper, after a couple of years, his English was good enough to study air conditioning manuals, and he passed the State Journeyman's qualification test.  He still works for the same contractor, sometimes wiring homes or installing air conditioners.

                                                 

                                                Granted he does not make a fortune, but he moonlights on the side, and there he can undercut the going rate and still make a nice bundle for himself, he works hard, he is now raising a family, and he never asked for welfare.  He is still hungry enough to remain a go-getter, should he lose his job or be unable to work as an electrician, he will never give up, and I have to admire his spirit.

                                        • Re: 5 Part-time jobs post-retirement
                                          BoBraxton

                                          I agree. Sounds like Siler City, NC, where I bought a small double lot in 1965 (summer). My own mother worked "piece work" in men's hosiery in NC, 1950's, before her seventh and eighth children were born (1957 and 1960). She is still alive (age 90). The Hosiery mill at the time paid 15 cents per piece (pair of men's hosiery) but she still had to turn out at least the minimum number of pieces -- for $35 per week.

                                      • Re: 5 Part-time jobs post-retirement
                                        BoBraxton

                                        I cherish my time (for creativity) in retirement.

                                        If Christian scripture reference is permitted: Galatians 5:1

                                        (I studied 1966-1969 in theological seminary).

                                        • Re: 5 Part-time jobs post-retirement
                                          TroutBum

                                          I'm not yet retired yet so, who knows?

                                          Before I became a desk bound manager I worked in construction, maintenance, renovation and home building; mostly carpentry related stuff. During the past several years, when I wasn't doing that type of work full time, I at least did enough to keep my skills sharp. I have to believe those are qualifications enough to help others and, at the same time, supplement my desire for an occasional bottle of wine.

                                          • Re: 5 Part-time jobs post-retirement
                                            hunter381

                                            Can we get back to the purpose of the original post, i.e., sharing thoughts on working part-time in retirement?

                                            • Re: 5 Part-time jobs post-retirement
                                              herbyreed

                                              Substitute teaching can be a good option for retired people - particularly retired teachers but others also who enjoy working with young people.  Some school systems treat substitutes very well and the pay is usually better and offers more flexible hours than most part-time jobs.