1 Reply Latest reply on Sep 3, 2011 5:43 PM by jkom51

    Retirement Communities: Pros and Cons

      I think that I would like to live in a retirement community as the opportunities to find golfing and fishing budies should be easy.  I am going to need male friends as I grow older and our present neighborhood does not show much promise.
       
      My wife, on the other hand, is quite content living in the suburbs, shopping, and living a less active life.
       
      If you live in a retirement community (like a Sun City-type), can you tell me what you like and don't like living there.
       
      Thanks in advance.
        • Re: Retirement Communities: Pros and Cons
          jkom51
          I ran across this article from SmartMoney magazine - you might want to access the entire article from the link. Renting would give you and your wife a chance to compare various communities and get an idea of what would like and what you wouldn't.
           
          Do be careful to investigate the finances of the holding company, before signing any long-term contracts. Some of them are in bad financial shape, apparently.


          Test Drive Your Retirement Home

          SmartMoney, 4/29/2011

          http://www.smartmoney.com/personal-finance/retirement/test-drive-your-retirement-home-1304011789458/#ixzz1L2OoFKqj

           

          Saddled with vacant units , retirement communities across the country are trying to lure new buyers by any means necessary – from adding cushy amenities and special move-in deals to lowering prices on homes. And with summer fast approaching, one tactic is becoming especially popular: the "test drive."

           

          Retirement communities in Arizona, California, Florida and other vacation destinations are pitching older Americans so-called retirement getaways, a few nights in a model home with access to all the luxury amenities. Their hope, of course, is that you never want to check out. And while no national data exists on how many communities are pushing these test drive programs, "they're definitely becoming more common," says Andrew Carle, the founding director of the senior housing administration program at George Mason University.