7 Replies Latest reply on Feb 11, 2010 10:53 AM by Rpete

    Retiring in Canada

    Rpete
      My wife and I are considering moving to Huntsville Ontario Canada from United States and probably retiring there.  Our daughter is close to having her first child and her husband would like to hire me, but my pay will be half what it is here in the states.  We're 55 and not wealthy so we'll need to work until maybe 60 or so.  I'm an Engineer so I can work over there.  Has anyone moved to Canada, how well does their medical coverage work ?   Any commints from an experienced person would be greatly appreciated.

        • Re: Retiring in Canada
          gardener
          We have a cottage just 1 hour from Huntsville.  It has been in the family for over 100 years.  It is a beautiful place.  The Canadians tolerate the health care, emergencies are treated rapidly.  It is a long cold winter as your daughter knows.  Americans are not always thought highly of.  We tend to be loud and know it alls.  Remember it is their country.  I would think long about the cold climate.  We moved to the warmth of NC 5 years ago. We can be outside everyday.  You can be in Huntsville all so if you enjoy winter sports - even dog sledding!  Good luck
          • Re: Retiring in Canada
            ldgpangeo
            My wife's family is Canadian.  The health care system is pretty good on the whole.  When members of her family have had serious problems they are addressed immediately and never a sense of "cutting corners" or needing to negotiate with anyone to get approval for the medical care.  For example, her brother had 4 heart surgeries that would have bankrupted most Americans -- even with a company medical insurance plan. 

            Routine preventive care is also very good.  There's never a problem getting periodic visits to one's primary care provider.

            On the other hand non-critical specialist items can have a very long wait compared to the States.  For example, getting a cataract removed can take months, where here it would be only a couple of weeks delay.
              • Re: Retiring in Canada
                Rpete
                Our daughter married a Canadian and moved to "cottage country" of Ontario, which is about 1.5 hr drive NW of Toronto.  They seem to get good medical coverage.  I was told if I move to Canada to work for the next 5 years or so until I retire that if I were in "lets say Florida" and needed medical attention my Canadian coverage would only pay the amount that would have been paid in Canada, so I'd get stuck with the extra amount, are you aware of this ?  Also, how soon am I covered after starting to work in Canada ?
              • Re: Retiring in Canada
                sciotown
                A few years ago, we looked into something similar. We learned that as nonimmigrants, we could actually be in Canada not more than 6 months. We also learned that qualifying to immigrate is more difficult the older you get. Although we were fully self-supporting and had good medical coverage, my husband's age made it highly likely we would not pass the tests. Immigration attorneys can help advise, but there's a lot of other information and help online as well. Good luck! 
                • Re: Retiring in Canada
                  RickM
                  I'm a dual citizen who has lived most of his life in the States.  My mother, sister, other family live in Canada, mostly in Ontario.  It's funny to hear Americans say how bad the Canadian health system is, since our family experience is just the opposite.  My mom got her knee replaced (some delay, but probably no more than you'd have in the USA if you weren't living in a major city), and got far more time in rehab than she would have down here.  Oh, and the whole thing was free.

                  Taxes are higher, and mortgage interest is not deductible, so figure that into your cost of living calculations.  And don't worry too much about the winters -- they're very manageable.  (Of course, I'm in Syracuse, so my basis of comparison may differ from yours.)

                  Not sure about the immigration regulations (not a worry for me), but I believe that your daughter should be able to sponsor you.  The folks at the Canadian Consulate are very helpful with such info.  And you can check out housing prices (if you intend to buy -- it may make more sense to rent) at www.mls.ca.