155440728.jpg
 
After a career spent working in the comings and goings of the city, it is assumed that retirees would be attracted to the serene confines of the country. However, according to a recent report in USA Today, many baby boomers are finding the urban lifestyle to be just as welcoming as rural locales.
 
Annette Fuller, managing editor of Where to Retire magazine, told the newspaper that there are many reasons why more seniors are moving to the city.
 
"The appeal of relocating to a metro area lies in the abundance of part-time jobs these cities offer, as well as big-city amenities, like cool ethnic restaurants and great shows," said Fuller. "These areas also have universities, meaning sports to love and classes to take - both excellent ways to assimilate."
 
The trend of seniors moving to cities has also been noticed by real estate agents. Ben Coleman, a broker-owner based in San Francisco, told USA Today that baby boomers are making a move that he himself foresees in the not-too-distant future.
 
"Once all the kids were gone why would I need a five-bedroom house?" Coleman said.
 
Adjustments to city-lifestyle
 
However, there are some adjustments that retirees will need to make upon moving to the city. According to Amy Levner, who heads the livable communities division of AARP, perhaps the biggest obstacle is affordability. Levner told the newspaper that many seniors may assume that they have the resources needed to relocate, only to be disappointed that they lack the means to do so.
 
"There will be some fortunate people who can afford it," she said. "But people need to be realistic. Is there enough housing that is available and inexpensive? That is the big X factor."
 
Another adjustment concerns space. In the city, not only are homes smaller, but there's less space dedicated to parking. At the same time, communities in cities are often more accessible by walking.
 
Included among the ten most populous cities in Where to Retire’s "America's 100 Best Places to Retire" are Phoenix, Austin, Nashville, Portland, and Ocean County, NJ.
 
For the full list, visit the USA Today website.
 
Speak up: Have you moved to the city upon retirement? Have you considered the move as you plan?